That there is a right way to clean your ears implies that there is a wrong way, and without a doubt, there is a very wrong way. The wrong way is customary, and it breaches the first rule of cleaning your ears: don’t insert foreign objects into your ear canal. That includes cotton swabs and any other item that will likely only push the earwax up against the eardrum, potentially causing irritation, temporary hearing loss, or eardrum damage.

So what should you be doing to clean your ears under normal conditions? In a word: nothing (I hope you weren’t looking for something more profound). Your ears are made to be self-cleaning, and the normal motions of your jaw drive earwax from the canal to the outer ear. If you attempt to remove it, your ear just produces more wax.

And earwax is essential, as it contains protective, lubricating, and antibacterial qualities. In fact, over-cleaning the ears leads to dry, itchy, irritated skin within the ear canal. Therefore, for the majority of people most of the time, nothing is required other than normal bathing to wash the outer ear.

But notice that we said MOST of the time, because there are situations in which people do generate too much earwax or excess earwax impacts the eardrum. In instances like these, you will need to clean out your ears. Here’s how:

Cleaning your ears at home

We will say it again: don’t insert any foreign objects into your ear canal. You can irritate the sensitive skin of the canal and can end up perforating your eardrum. This means no cotton swabs and positively no ear candles. (Speaking of ear candles, in 2010, the FDA released a warning against using them, announcing that no scientific evidence supports their effectiveness and that their use can generate serious injuries.)

To correctly clean your ears at home, take the following methods:

  1. Buy earwax softening solution at the pharmacy or make some at home. Directions for making the solution can be found on the web, and the solution often includes the use of hydrogen peroxide, mineral oil, and glycerin.
  2. Pour the solution into your ears from the bowl or by using a plastic or bulb syringe. Tilt your head to the side and let the solution to work for 5-10 minutes.
  3. Empty the solution out of your ear by tilting your head slowly over a bowl or the sink, or you can use a cotton ball pressed against the outside of the ear. (I know it’s tempting, but again, don’t push the cotton ball into your ear.)
  4. Flush out your ears with lukewarm water using a bulb syringe to free any loose earwax.

When not to clean your ears at home

Cleaning your ears at home could be hazardous in the presence of an ear infection or a perforated eardrum. If you suffer from any symptoms such as fever, dizziness, ear pain, or ear discharge, it’s best to speak with your doctor or hearing specialist. Additionally, repeated attempts at self cleaning that are unsuccessful may signify a more severe congestion that will require professional cleaning.

Medical doctors and hearing specialists use a variety of medicines and instruments to quickly, thoroughly, and safely remove excess earwax. The solutions tend to be more powerful than the homemade versions, and instruments called curettes can be inserted into the ear to manually remove the wax.

When in doubt, leave it to the experts. You’ll get the assurance that you’re not causing harm to your ears, and symptoms can subside within minutes of a professional cleaning. In addition, underlying problems or hearing loss can be identified and corrected by a professional.

If you have any further questions or want to set up an appointment, give us a call today! And keep in mind, if you’re a hearing aid user, you’ll want to get a routine professional checkup every 6 months.

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